In: Services 23 Oct 2014 Tags: , , , , , , , ,

The 470-694MHz has been historically used in Europe for terrestrial broadcast network, delivering public and private broadcast through fixed rooftop reception. Advances in technology and evolution of consumer habits have triggered discussions about the future use of the 470-694MHz. In particular, there is a trend towards mobile consumption for audiovisual content (including audiovisual media services) creating the necessity to consider how broadcasting and mobile services could complement each other in the delivery of audiovisual (both linear and non-linear) content to mobile terminals. The topic was discussed in the High Level Group on the future use of the UHF band led by Pascal Lamy and the Plum Consulting/Farncombe study on broadcast-broadband convergence, both initiatives from the European Commission. From the CEPT side, the ECC Report 224 on ‘Long Term Vision for the UHF broadcasting band’ described, in particular, a number of scenarios corresponding to convergence of broadcast services on the mobile platform.

All reports and study groups acknowledged the potential of a converged platform, designed as a Low Power Low Tower network operating in Supplemental DL mode as a nationwide Single Frequency Network (SFN). While technical feasibility of such an approach was recognized, reports stressed that further studies were required in order to address precisely the coverage achieved by such networks at the border between two SFNs.

The study below aims at providing a full assessment of the coverage properties of downlink LPLT networks for the delivery of broadcast content, especially at the border of two SFNs.

 

The technical proposal is to reuse existing base stations operated by mobile operators to deliver an LTE Broadcast service in the 470-694 MHz band. Reusing existing sites provides numerous benefits, in particular in order to reduce the cost of deployment of such a network. The service should deliver 2 bps/Hz to mobile devices and fixed rooftop antennas alike, in order to significantly increase the capacity of the mobile platform. The LTE Broadcast service considered corresponds to an evolution of the current LTE eMBMS standard, in particular in order to support longer cyclic prefixes (200 µsec).

One of the benefits of adopting LTE as a standard for broadcasting is to leverage the advanced signal processing capabilities of LTE terminals. LTE eMBMS only requires 16dB of SINR to deliver 2bps/Hz in a very challenging mobile environment. Fixed rooftop reception is ensured with much lower SINR requirements. LTE receivers also support features – such as interference cancellation – which improve performance in challenging SNIR environment.

 

Qualcomm / ATDI study report

Qualcomm-ATDI LPLT Broadcast Networks Presentation

EBU tr-027 Delivery of broadcast content over LTE networks

 

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In: Press releases, Products 23 Oct 2014 Tags: , , , ,

Where Wi-Fi won’t, white spaces will.

The potential for white spaces to facilitate systems from city-wide wireless broadband networks to remote monitoring of electricity meters is being outlined in a new ATDI document – along with how to use the company’s flagship planning and modelling tools to unlock the resources that white spaces represent.

White spaces are vacant frequencies made available for unlicensed use at locations where spectrum is not being used by licensed services. This band is currently used by television companies and programme-making and special events (PMSE) operators; in a region where a broadcast channel is not in use for broadcasting, the spectrum is fallow.

“Unused spectrum is somewhat more valuable than gold in the radiocommunications industry,” comments ATDI technical director Nick Kirkman. “ATDI has been considering the best ways to exploit the potential white space represents for some time and the results of that now feature in the ICS software suite.”

The majority of current Wi-Fi devices operate in spectrum at 2.4GHz. White spaces could not only provide new spectrum capacity but also boost the distance a device can be from a base station and still be connected, thanks to the lower frequency involved – typically between 470 and 790MHz. This has the potential to facilitate wireless broadband networks that stretch across towns and cities.

White space technology works in a similar way to Wi-Fi which uses a wireless router to send and receive information to other wireless devices. The main difference is that the white space router will first need to consult a list of online databases. It will notify one of these databases of its location and update it on a regular basis.

The latest versions from the ICS telecom family calculate from the database of television stations the channels available on each point in a given area. This protects the existing spectrum users against any harmful interference, while providing resources to new operators who have not been allocated licensed spectrum.

ATDI’s brochure also outlines white spaces’ potential for facilitating rural broadband and the Internet of things, whereby homes and offices are fitted with smart meters and sensors which can be read remotely.

 

About White-Spaces

 

whitespace

In: Press releases 23 Oct 2014 Tags: , , ,

ATDI is now – officially – part of the global effort to get best use from the radio spectrum.

“It’s what we’ve been doing for the two decades we have been in business,” comments lead engineer Paul Grant. “But now we’ve been invited to join the likes of Microsoft and Google in the international and industry-wide campaign for the most effective use of frequency resources.”

ATDI is now a member of the Dynamic Spectrum Alliance (DSA), a global organisation pressing for laws and regulations that will lead to more efficient spectrum use. DSA’s key goals are to support technical, regulatory and business models to reduce the cost of last-mile deployments, to back spectrum policies supporting the growing Internet of things and to campaign for regulatory change to release bandwidth.

Paul comments: “If you look at DSA’s membership, it spans multinationals including Microsoft and Google along with smaller companies, academic institutions and research organisations from around the world. There’s loads of political and financial clout there along with amazing amounts of expertise. It’s a real honour for ATDI to be asked to join such company and we look forward to making our contribution.”

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