In: Press releases, Products 23 Oct 2014 Tags: , , , ,

Where Wi-Fi won’t, white spaces will.

The potential for white spaces to facilitate systems from city-wide wireless broadband networks to remote monitoring of electricity meters is being outlined in a new ATDI document – along with how to use the company’s flagship planning and modelling tools to unlock the resources that white spaces represent.

White spaces are vacant frequencies made available for unlicensed use at locations where spectrum is not being used by licensed services. This band is currently used by television companies and programme-making and special events (PMSE) operators; in a region where a broadcast channel is not in use for broadcasting, the spectrum is fallow.

“Unused spectrum is somewhat more valuable than gold in the radiocommunications industry,” comments ATDI technical director Nick Kirkman. “ATDI has been considering the best ways to exploit the potential white space represents for some time and the results of that now feature in the ICS software suite.”

The majority of current Wi-Fi devices operate in spectrum at 2.4GHz. White spaces could not only provide new spectrum capacity but also boost the distance a device can be from a base station and still be connected, thanks to the lower frequency involved – typically between 470 and 790MHz. This has the potential to facilitate wireless broadband networks that stretch across towns and cities.

White space technology works in a similar way to Wi-Fi which uses a wireless router to send and receive information to other wireless devices. The main difference is that the white space router will first need to consult a list of online databases. It will notify one of these databases of its location and update it on a regular basis.

The latest versions from the ICS telecom family calculate from the database of television stations the channels available on each point in a given area. This protects the existing spectrum users against any harmful interference, while providing resources to new operators who have not been allocated licensed spectrum.

ATDI’s brochure also outlines white spaces’ potential for facilitating rural broadband and the Internet of things, whereby homes and offices are fitted with smart meters and sensors which can be read remotely.

 

About White-Spaces

 

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In: Press releases, Products 23 Oct 2014 Tags: , , , , , ,

As EE continues to develop its 4G – LTE – network, its focus turns to operations in the 2.6 GHz band, where it needs to ensure its next-generation services for its mobile phone customers do not interfere with vital systems such as air traffic radars operating at 2.7 GHz.
Spectrum regulator Ofcom has produced an exacting framework for this process, seeking to guarantee both that safety is not compromised and that EE, which has committed huge resources to buying the spectrum rights and building its network, actually gets value for its investment.
As part of the framework, Ofcom is stipulating that not only must operators consider current radars but also future developments such as the migration of radar systems to S-band.
To help achieve this, EE has used ATDI’s flagship planning and modelling tool ICS telecom as well as the company’s 20 years of expertise in dealing with both the current situation and the one to come.
“There’s an element of politics here as well as engineering,” comments ATDI managing director Peter Paul. “EE needs its network to operate into the long term; air traffic controllers need radar to operate into the long term. Making those two imperatives sit together, particularly as radars move one at a time into the S-band, takes discussion and some diplomacy – as well as extremely precise modelling.”
A 4G/LTE signal has the power to saturate a radar receiver thereby rendering the system useless. To help customers avoid such problems, ATDI has built a new function into ICS telecom specifically tailored to the needs of EE and other 4G operators when trying to coexist with radars.
“The development of ICS telecom has been driven by customer needs since it was launched two decades ago,” Peter notes. “Everything in it now is of profound practical value to the people using it. That’s the wonderful flexibility of being a smaller company.”

 

 

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In: Press releases, Products, Resources, Services 09 Oct 2014 Tags: , , , ,

ATDI is now member of the Dynamic Spectrum Alliance (DSA).

The Dynamic Spectrum Alliance is a global organization advocating for laws and regulations that will lead to more efficient and effective spectrum utilization. The membership are working to create innovative solutions that will increase the amount of available spectrum to the benefit of consumers and businesses alike.
In that way, ATDI offers its knowledge and expertise with a global solution for White-Space calculation and Database.

Brochure

About Dynamic Spectrum Alliance
DSA members

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