In: Products, Services 22 Mar 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Speed through the air is becoming a growing imperative as ATDI helps both a mobile network and commercial flights reach maximum potential.

Network operator EE has now developed its tri-carrier LTE-Advanced structure to the extent that a demonstration was conducted at Wembley Stadium at the end of February delivering more than 400 Mbps. The system has been built using ATDI’s flagship planning and modelling software ICS Telecom to ensure it does not interfere with air traffic radars operating in the 2.7 Ghz range; EE’s LTE-Advanced utilises a combined 20 MHz of 1800-MHz spectrum with 20 MHz of 2.6-GHz spectrum, and another, separate 15 MHz chunk of 2.6-GHz spectrum. The 1800MHz band does not affect radars.

“Clearly, it is imperative that EE gets value for its investment by having a network that works for its customers and nobody needs telling how important it is to have air traffic control radars operating without interference,” notes ATDI operations director Paul Grant.  “EE’s use of ICS Telecom has been an integral part of ensuring both those things happen. Indeed, EE is continuing to take technical support from ATDI to make certain its engineers are getting the most out of ICS Telecom’s 2.6GHz coordination feature.”

The LTE-Advanced signal has the power to saturate a radar receiver thereby rendering the system useless. Many of the air traffic control radars have now had filters installed so possible interference areas are limited to areas close to the radar head.

EE’s Wembley Stadium demonstration created what the company called an interactive gig experience involving an audio-visual installation featuring multiple 4K and HD screens and high-quality audio streaming.


Aeronautical functions in ICS telecom:



Multilateration (multi-ranging / passive)


RADAR (monostatic, bistatic, multistatic)

RADAR coordination (2.6 / 3.4 GHz)







In: Press releases, Services 03 Dec 2014 Tags: , , , , , ,

Digital dividend in Brazil (700 MHz for new 4G mobile services)


ATDI is helping to expand the burgeoning Brazilian economy with a plan that will enable people to watch television and talk on the phone at the same time.

Brazil is planning to re-use its digital dividend 700MHz frequencies for new 4G mobile services. These will be in a band adjacent to existing television signals and ATDI has been tasked by the GSMA, which represents the interests of mobile operators worldwide, to plan and model the re-shaped spectrum usage to identify and mitigate potential interference issues.

“Terrestrial, free-to-air television is particularly significant in Brazil given the country’s modest uptake of cable and satellite services. A lot of people would be at risk of being very unhappy if we had been anything other than entirely accurate in our planning and modelling.”

A complicating issue is that analogue television had to be factored into the equation due to the envisaged long transition to digital.

“It has been a very challenging but very rewarding task.”

ATDI has now delivered a report which examines ways to mitigate interference between the proposed new mobile signals and the existing and planned television services. It presents a number of options for ensuring clear signals including filtering and minimising TV transmission powers in channels immediately adjacent to LTE services.

“The advent of fourth-generation mobile services globally has meant we have now conducted this kind of survey and report in places from the mountains of north Europe to the icecaps of Iceland to Brazil, It is exciting to know we can develop techniques that work no matter what the terrain, the climate or the population density.”

ATDI Report

A copy of the full release is available via the GSMA website: GSMA



In: Services 23 Oct 2014 Tags: , , , , , , , ,

The 470-694MHz has been historically used in Europe for terrestrial broadcast network, delivering public and private broadcast through fixed rooftop reception. Advances in technology and evolution of consumer habits have triggered discussions about the future use of the 470-694MHz. In particular, there is a trend towards mobile consumption for audiovisual content (including audiovisual media services) creating the necessity to consider how broadcasting and mobile services could complement each other in the delivery of audiovisual (both linear and non-linear) content to mobile terminals. The topic was discussed in the High Level Group on the future use of the UHF band led by Pascal Lamy and the Plum Consulting/Farncombe study on broadcast-broadband convergence, both initiatives from the European Commission. From the CEPT side, the ECC Report 224 on ‘Long Term Vision for the UHF broadcasting band’ described, in particular, a number of scenarios corresponding to convergence of broadcast services on the mobile platform.

All reports and study groups acknowledged the potential of a converged platform, designed as a Low Power Low Tower network operating in Supplemental DL mode as a nationwide Single Frequency Network (SFN). While technical feasibility of such an approach was recognized, reports stressed that further studies were required in order to address precisely the coverage achieved by such networks at the border between two SFNs.

The study below aims at providing a full assessment of the coverage properties of downlink LPLT networks for the delivery of broadcast content, especially at the border of two SFNs.


The technical proposal is to reuse existing base stations operated by mobile operators to deliver an LTE Broadcast service in the 470-694 MHz band. Reusing existing sites provides numerous benefits, in particular in order to reduce the cost of deployment of such a network. The service should deliver 2 bps/Hz to mobile devices and fixed rooftop antennas alike, in order to significantly increase the capacity of the mobile platform. The LTE Broadcast service considered corresponds to an evolution of the current LTE eMBMS standard, in particular in order to support longer cyclic prefixes (200 µsec).

One of the benefits of adopting LTE as a standard for broadcasting is to leverage the advanced signal processing capabilities of LTE terminals. LTE eMBMS only requires 16dB of SINR to deliver 2bps/Hz in a very challenging mobile environment. Fixed rooftop reception is ensured with much lower SINR requirements. LTE receivers also support features – such as interference cancellation – which improve performance in challenging SNIR environment.


Qualcomm / ATDI study report

Qualcomm-ATDI LPLT Broadcast Networks Presentation

EBU tr-027 Delivery of broadcast content over LTE networks